Another Header

April 17, 2017

France: Porto Corsica


Ota Corsica’s port is a popular beach destination, at least in the middle of summer. But as we learned when we visited in the middle of November 2016, Porto is a seasonal resort; most everything closes for the off-season. With few tourists the town has a weird “redrum” feeling. If a young Jack Nicholson suddenly appeared, we were definitely bolting out of the town. (more…)

April 9, 2017

France: Great Saltworks of Salins-les-Bains and the Royal Saltworks of Arc-et-Senans


A tunnel beneath the saltworks at Salins-les-Bains brings brine to the drying pans.

Salins-les-Bains and Arc-et-Senans are in the Jura and Doubs departments of France, respectively. Both administrative departments are on France’s eastern border with Switzerland. As of 2015 Jura and Doubs were part of the larger administrative region of Franche-Comté, the only region of the continental portion of France that we hadn’t visited. But by the time we first arrived in Franche-Comté in 2016 it turned out that we already had visited all of the administrative regions of continental France. How did that happen? At the start of 2016 Franche-Comté was consolidated into a larger region, Bourgogne-Franche-Comté. A legislative act eliminated Franche-Comté before we could visit. (more…)

April 8, 2017

Switzerland: Bern


An interesting fact: Switzerland has no formal capitol. Instead the country has a federal city, the place where most of the federal governmental buildings (parliament, executive, administration) are located. That city is Bern. (more…)

January 30, 2016

Spain: Caceres


 

Plaza Mayor de Cáceres

Plaza Mayor de Cáceres

The Romans founded Cáceres Spain in 25 BC. Following the Romans, the Barbarians, the Visigoths, the Moors, and the Christians occupied Cáceres. Through it all Cáceres’ medieval quarter has remained remarkably intact. Today UNESCO recognizes historic Cáceres for its blend of Roman, Moorish, Northern Gothic and Italian Renaissance architecture. (more…)

February 16, 2015

France: Reims


Looking up inside one of towers at Reim's cathedral.

Looking up inside one of towers at Reim’s cathedral.

Eighty miles east-northeast of Paris is the historic city of Reims. Founded before the birth of Christ by the Gauls, Reims later became an important city in the Roman Empire. After the fall of the Roman Empire, Reims rose as a religious center. It’s famous cathedral was the traditional site of the crowning of the kings of France, playing the same role in France as Westminster Abbey does in the United Kingdom. (more…)

November 13, 2013

France: Belfries


Belfries in Calais (left) and Cambrai (right)

Belfries in Calais (left) and Cambrai (right)

From 1999 to 2005 UNESCO designated 56 historical bell towers in and near historic Flanders as a World Heritage site.  Built between the 11th and 17th Centuries, the Belfries (more…)

November 19, 2012

England: Liverpool


Liverpool One’s escalator at night

By reputation rain is inevitable on any visit to England.  In truth it doesn’t rain as often as advertised.  Sunny days are not that uncommon, or so we hear.  Still “rain, heavy at times” (more…)

September 15, 2012

Wales: Castles and Town Walls of King Edward in Gwynedd


Inside Caernarfon Castle’s walls

Castles and Town Walls of King Edward in Gwynedd” is the UNESCO World Heritage name for a collection of historic sites in North Wales.  In 1986 four castles and their (more…)

August 23, 2012

Wales: Pontcysyllte Aqueduct


A narrow passes high over the Welsh countryside

“A, E, I, O, U and sometimes Y and W.”

(more…)

July 30, 2012

Turkey: Istanbul, The New Mosque


The New Mosque

Yeni Camii is an Ottoman era imperial mosque in Istanbul.  In English it is commonly known as The New Mosque.  (Yeni Camii translates from Turkish as “New Mosque.”) (more…)

Older Posts »

Blog at WordPress.com.