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June 29, 2011

National Parks: Bryce Canyon


This trail leads to Tower Bridge in Bryce Canyon National Park

It’s all about the badlands.  In iconic Bryce Canyon National Park the multihued eroded landscape is the singular attraction.  Forests of sandstone hoodoos draw visitors.  Sometimes it’s good to be badland.

Yes it's true, I poach wedding photos

Bryce is a popular park.  Despite its remote location, this National Park received 1.3 million visits in 2010, ranking 15th of the 58 parks.  We contributed our two visits to the 2011 tally.

Despite the name, Bryce Canyon is not a canyon.  Bryce’s dominant geological feature is natural amphitheater formed by erosion of the eastern side of the Paunsaugunt Plateau.  The force of wind and water left behind a spectacle in the style of the older National Parks.  Established as a National Monument in 1923 and upgraded to a National Park in 1928, Bryce, as with other National Parks of the early era, displays wilderness as a wonder.

Roadside overlooks provide easy views into fields of brightly colored hoodoos; easy access makes Bryce Canyon a good park for a short visit.  This stop, with more time, we went past the overlooks and trekked down into the canyon taking the trail from Sunrise Point to Tower Bridge.  Bryce Canyon’s front country trails are worth the effort; wandering amongst the hoodoos is surreal.  Yet no matter what you do during a visit, it’s always good to be in Bryce’s badlands.


More pictures have been posted to Picasa.

Tower Bridge

The trail to Tower Bridge

Inspiration Point

Rainbow Point informational kiosk (color IR)

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2 Comments »

  1. […] Bryce (2011) […]

    Pingback by The List « Another Header — July 22, 2011 @ 9:15 pm

  2. […] Parks and Monuments interconnected by scenic highways.  Grand Canyon, Zion, Capitol Reef, and Bryce Canyon National Parks are just a few hours […]

    Pingback by Page Arizona « Another Header — April 25, 2012 @ 4:33 am


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