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September 17, 2008

Bad Wimpfen

Filed under: Germany 2007, Travel — anotherheader @ 8:28 pm

The Schweine (Swine) Museum in Bad Wimpfen

The Schweine (Swine) Museum in Bad Wimpfen

We liked the name; therefore, we had to go.

We set out from our hotel after flipping through the guidebooks to see what looked interesting. In the end, we decided to head north to Bad Wimpfen in the Neckar Valley for some sightseeing.

Soon after hitting town, Becky spied the Schweine Museum (Pig Museum). After the fiasco with the Lamb World in New Zealand, Dave new he had no choice. Fortunately the museum was small and featured a collection of everything pig, mostly kitsch and collectables from around the world.

The town of Bad Wimpfen itself is a quaint burg with many historic half-timbered house sprinkled in the formally walled off area. Things were quiet, especially during

In New Zealand, the disappointment was extreme when Dave said we couldn't fit SheepWorld into our stay!

In New Zealand, the disappointment was extreme when Dave said we couldn

lunch and we saw everything that was open in a couple of hours, so we moved down the road (“Burgstrasse”) to Burg Hornburg for the sights, lunch, and yet more beer. We even threw in a little wine tasting for good measure.

Burg Hornberg is a large castle on the ridge in the vineyards above the Neckar River. It is interesting in that, unlike many of the castles that we visited, it had not been substantially restored and was in a state of elegant decay.

From Burg Hornberg, we headed to the Auto & Technik Museum Sinsheim (in Sinsheim, not surprisingly). We noticed this museum on the drive up. It was hard to miss, as it has a good collection of planes displayed around and above the museum buildings. We are not talking models—the whole

Bad Wimpfen

Bad Wimpfen

Burg Hornberg

Burg Hornberg

planes were suspended. Most notable were the Concord and the Tupolev 144, the only two supersonic airliners to caring commercial traffic. The planes were quite impressive, but it was even more impressive to see them displayed off the ground. To get the planes in place, they had to partially dismantled them and then bring them down the autobahn. I’m imagining that they did not use the fast lane for this one. That’s just a guess. Aside from the planes, two large buildings held examples of pretty much every type of plane, train, automobile, and military equipment you could imagine. The museum was nearly as obsessive as the Schweine Museum from earlier in the day.

There’s an interesting way to return to the Museum floor from the rooftop displays. We

Burg Hornberg

Burg Hornberg

The Concord (a real plane) at the Auto & Technik Museum, Sinsheim

The Concord (a real plane) at the Auto & Technik Museum, Sinsheim

More planes outside.  Note the DC-3 with the slide exit to the museum floor inside--nothing like safety measures!

More planes outside. Note the DC-3 with the slide exit to the museum floor inside--nothing like safety measures!

took the slide attached to a DC-3 that drops you right onto the museum floor (see the pictures). Becky’s squeal gave Dave some pause, but it really was OK after your dropped like a rock for a story or so.

In any event, we did a bunch of driving with the trucks on the autobahn today and we will do more time in the car tomorrow as we move to Wurzburg. By the way, does anyone know if rental cars view permanent finger impressions in the dash on the passenger side of the car as “damage”?

Inside the museum

Inside the museum

Pictures:

http://picasaweb.google.com/brainbucketster/BadWimpfenPlus

Tupolev 144 from below

Tupolev 144 from below

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1 Comment »

  1. […] Technikmuseum Speyer on a prior trip.  In reality we had visited a similar and related museum, the Auto & Technik Museum Sinsheim, several years before.  Perhaps it is easy to mistake the two museums; Sinsheim is 30 minutes from […]

    Pingback by Germany: Speyer « Another Header — May 14, 2012 @ 8:15 pm


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